According to the Federal Aviation Administration, nearly 25% of all fatal aviation accidents occur due to dangerous maneuvering attempts made by pilots during aircraft stalling scenarios. Such statistics call for the implementation of adequate safety components on aircraft with consideration of the angles of attack that cause stalls for supplementing existing stall warning mechanisms. 


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After flying aircraft for years, pilots get quite accustomed to the noise in the cockpit. In fact, depending on the aircraft they are flying, pilots may even feel that the noise is negligible or not that loud. However, according to one of the safety brochures, the FAA Hearing and Noise in Aviation, the sound levels in a single-engine cockpit can go up to 90 decibels. If you are a pilot, you already know how important it is to protect your ears from this noise, as exposure to such high noise can cause permanent hearing loss. The best way to protect your ears from this sustained exposure is by wearing a high-quality pilot headset.


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Pressure altitude and density altitude are two terms that often confuse rookie pilots, but understanding them is no easy feat. Nonetheless, familiarizing yourself with the differences between each can help you better understand the forces acting on your aircraft. While an experienced pilot can readily explain their distinctive features, for those that need clarification, this blog will provide a brief overview of pressure altitude and density altitude.


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Painting an aircraft is a complex job and has many steps that must be carefully worked through. Planes are usually painted every seven to ten years, and the process of painting an aircraft takes almost a few weeks. Depending on the type of paint used, there may be a need to apply a base coat or clear coat. If the painting job is done incorrectly, it can be hazardous for aircraft performance. As a result, it is very important that one has a basic understanding of the painting process and how to properly execute it.


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In the modern day, most people are familiar with aircraft and what they are. If one was asked to list all the essential things an airplane has, their answer would most likely include the engine, wings, landing gear, etc.Despite this, not many would consider airplane lighting to be a critical item included on their list. Additionally, it may not even have struck some that airplane lighting can be an essential item,  as an airplane has to be designed as per its needs.


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Carbureted engines have long been the most popular engine type used on personal and small utility aircraft. This is due to their simple design, reliability, and enhanced fuel-efficiency. Unique to the carbureted engine, however, is the need to alter the amount of fuel entering the engine's combustion chamber as altitude changes. In this blog, we will discuss how carbureted engines function, why there is a variable fuel requirement, and how the engine's design allows pilots to regulate the fuel mixture.


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Engine fires are extremely hazardous during flight, often posing various safety risks that makes mitigating the chance of such occurrences paramount. Engine fires can often occur from a variety of issues, the most common being a result of over-priming the engine. While engine fires can occur throughout the year if certain issues occur, the most common time for them to happen is during the fall season. While this can be surprising due to the cold conditions that the season brings, it is important that fliers are well aware of why hazards increase during the fall, and how to prevent dangerous fires.


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The cowling of an aircraft engine is the structure’s removable covering, primarily used for drag reduction and increased cooling. During a standard flight, only around 15-30% of total ram airflow colliding with the engine nacelle will actually enter the structure for cooling. As such, the rest of the ram airflow remains outside of the cowling and cannot be optimally used. To improve upon this, the engine cowl will need to be faired in such a way that air may flow across the cowl with low energy loss.


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Operating and caring for a privately owned aircraft can be a complex job, requiring one to be on top of maintenance schedules, pilot certifications or the management of a crew, knowing the standard procedures of various landing destinations, and much more. While many of these things require extensive knowledge or experience, there are many smaller factors that can play into ensuring safe and efficient operations. In this blog, we will discuss some of the main things that all owners should keep in their aircraft that can make flight much easier throughout different conditions.


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Oil breathers are a necessary accessory for aircraft, commonly applied to a reciprocating internal combustion engine to prevent pressure from building within the crankcase. Contributed through heat generated by an engine rising to a temperature hot enough to vaporize oil, oil breathers are constructed to vent any hot air created within the system. Following the rising nature of hot air, oil breathers are affixed to the top of an engine for this reason. Accompanied by breather ventilation tubes, these components are often redirected to the bottom of your vehicle's engine cowling for optimal ventilation of excess heat. Within this blog, we will discuss the primary necessities of oil breathers, their necessary parts, and conditions to be wary of.


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While many automobiles have the capability to easily reverse their direction as needed, aircraft are actually devoid of the reverse gear necessary to conduct such operations. In general, the only time in which an aircraft will need to move backward is when they are pulled from the gate of an airport. Despite some aircraft being capable of moving backward on their own through the use of reverse thrust devices, such methods are not optimal and all reverse movement is typically provided by aircraft tugs.


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If you are a pilot or mechanic, standard engine malfunctions within carburetor and fuel-injected systems can be a common occurrence when attempting to start your aircraft; that can be especially said for individuals still learning how to fly. Improperly starting an aircraft engine, even if unintentional, can cause long-term damage further down the line. Frequent mistakes often made by a pilot when starting an engine include over-priming, engine flooding, multiple engine start attempts, attempting to start a cold-soaked engine, and using too much throttle when starting the vehicle. Within this blog, to better understand why start-up issues occur and how to best prevent them, we will go over common mistakes made by pilots and how precautionary measures can be taken to help mitigate further concerns.


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Aircraft fuel systems are complex setups that can vary greatly in aircraft of differing types and sizes. Nevertheless, the basic parts of the fuel system are the same in any aircraft. These are the tanks, cells, lines, valves, filtering units, and pumps. In this blog, we will focus on three of these parts: the fuel tanks, fuel cells, and fuel lines, providing an overview of each component and how they relate to each other.


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As the oxygen density and air pressure of high-altitude air are both too low for the well-being of individuals, a majority of aircraft utilize pressurization systems in order to manage cabin air. While pressurization systems may differ in their part makeup depending on the aircraft and its characteristics, many will utilize similar methods such as using engine bleed air, valves, and control systems for pressure management. As aircraft pressurization is crucial for the safety and health of pilots, crew members, and passengers alike, it can be very beneficial to understand how they function throughout the course of a flight.


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Each part of an aircraft has a different but equally important role in ensuring the aircraft’s ability to safely and smoothly fly. In this blog, we will discuss the seven main components of an aircraft: the fuselage, cockpit, wings, tail (empennage), engines, propeller, and landing gear.


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The Flight Data Recorder (FDR) is a device that is capable of capturing and storing data pertaining to aircraft performance. While aviation accidents are exceedingly rare, analyzing the data and information from a downed aircraft can ensure that safety is improved and such incidents are avoided in the future. As technology has progressed, many aircraft have also benefited from the addition of the cockpit voice recorder (CVR), that of which records pilot communication. In this blog, we will provide an overview of the Flight Data Recorder, allowing you to understand how it functions and how aerospace investigators use the data stored on such devices to improve flight safety.


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